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Posts from the ‘technology staffing’ Category

Executive Women Can Advance on Traditional Turf

The talking heads dominating the political scene south of the border may have given a passing nod to the role the fairer sex has to play in a thriving economy during the second presidential debate, but in this country, the binders full of employable executive-level women suffer no such slight. In Canada, women are an undismissively integral part of the economic engine and, further, stand poised to capitalize on even more opportunities in days to come.

 

 

 

 

 

A new study by Ipsos Reid polled Canadian female executives and concluded that the best bets for their swelling ranks appear to be in the “traditional” fields.

Specifically, says the research, the healthcare and education sectors offer the most potential for advancement for this country’s executive-level women. Some 58% of the 500 female managers and executives polled say they feel that healthcare provides the best chances for growth in the next three to five years — more than anywhere else. A little more than half of respondents (52%), meanwhile, point to education as the most promising territory for feminine success.

Other professional fields that ranked high on the list were the not-for-profit sector (35%), financial services (32%), hospitality (29%), professional services (23%) and the public sector (22%).

Information technology (11%), engineering and construction (6%), oil and gas (3%), and transportation and logistics (2%) rounded out the list. The industry cited as the least promising for women on the climb (surprise, surprise)? Manufacturing, at just 1%.

Navigating the Hump

In the United States, some 12,000 baby boomers exit the workforce every day. In Canada, the median age of “active” citizens is a stunning 43.7 years (we averaged out at 38.1 in 1991), and some 41% of the working-age population is between 45 and 64, up from 29% in 1991. The world’s workforce, as boomers hit magic mark after magic mark, is old and getting older. More senior workers are leaving the labour market earlier, more junior workers are entering it later, and the needs and policies that defined the Canadian workforce even a decade ago are suddenly and stunningly no longer applicable.

So much of the unrest is a function of the so-called “baby-boom effect,” a reference to that swell of souls born between 1946 and 1966 whose ranks represent a full third of Canada’s population and account for 41% of the labour force. Read more

Hiring for Culture First

Everybody’s heard a story about an office whose breakroom is stuffed with pool tables, where the sushi lunch every Friday is company supplied, where staffers set their own hours and bring their schnauzers to work. Such is the lore of company culture, the buzziest of buzz terms scorching the current corporate landscape — and managers ignore its siren call at their considerable peril.

According to a recent study by management consultancy Deloitte, today’s employees believe that company culture — or those values and practices to which an organization commits in demonstration of its identified priorities — is almost as important to business success as strategy is.

Adopt it as a critical tenet of your organizational existence and enjoy the fruits in hiring, retention, motivation, loyalty, productivity, creativity and, yes, profitability.

But how, we ask (above the cries to “Hire for cultural fit! Forget professional competencies! Skills can be learned!”) to measure for such a thing in a potential employee? Read more

Rocking the RRR (Recruiter-Recruitee Relationship)

Ours is a time, they tell us, of inarguable and unmitigated contraction. Bellies are tightening, prospects are dimming, hope is shrinking.

Blah, blah, blah.

But let the sun burn clean through the gauze of despair, why don’t you, and you may well discover an adjusted scene in the gloaming.

Things are fiercely competitive on the job-seeking front, yes. But fantastically so. What’s better for a go-getter than the opportunity to get going? And, better still, to do so in the supremely competent company of a professional recruiter?

If your job seeking is taking place according to a recruiter-broker model, it’s important to exploit the resources at your disposal. Remember: Recruiters are paid to act as intermediaries. Here’s how to put them to work. Read more