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Posts from the ‘permanent recruiting’ Category

Executive Women Can Advance on Traditional Turf

The talking heads dominating the political scene south of the border may have given a passing nod to the role the fairer sex has to play in a thriving economy during the second presidential debate, but in this country, the binders full of employable executive-level women suffer no such slight. In Canada, women are an undismissively integral part of the economic engine and, further, stand poised to capitalize on even more opportunities in days to come.

 

 

 

 

 

A new study by Ipsos Reid polled Canadian female executives and concluded that the best bets for their swelling ranks appear to be in the “traditional” fields.

Specifically, says the research, the healthcare and education sectors offer the most potential for advancement for this country’s executive-level women. Some 58% of the 500 female managers and executives polled say they feel that healthcare provides the best chances for growth in the next three to five years — more than anywhere else. A little more than half of respondents (52%), meanwhile, point to education as the most promising territory for feminine success.

Other professional fields that ranked high on the list were the not-for-profit sector (35%), financial services (32%), hospitality (29%), professional services (23%) and the public sector (22%).

Information technology (11%), engineering and construction (6%), oil and gas (3%), and transportation and logistics (2%) rounded out the list. The industry cited as the least promising for women on the climb (surprise, surprise)? Manufacturing, at just 1%.

Bridging the Immigrant Employment Gap

Everybody’s heard the story about the brain-surgeon cabbie or the chemical-engineer office cleaner. These are the Canadian immigrants who arrive on our shores qualified to the gills but unable to find employment in their new country to match the skills they brought from their old.

Immigrants move to Canada because they’ve heard it’s got lots of jobs and generous benefits. It’s why we take in about 250,000 newcomers a year — more, on a per-capita basis, than any other industrial country. By 2031, StatsCan suggests, one in three workers could be foreign-born.

But these folks’ integration into a new society comes with myriad challenges. In addition to securing employment, there are language, cultural and educational hurdles to be overcome.

According to a July 2008 report, 54% of people who’ve settled in Canada since 2002 have been university-educated. But the unemployment rate for these souls, as of 2007, was quadruple that of Canadian-born residents with university degrees.

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Some resources and advice to help this population find its employment feet.

• Bridging programs, like those from the province (www.ontarioimmigration.ca) or Toronto’s Ryerson University (www.ryerson.ca) offer mentor-matching and arrange mock interviews with real employers.

• The Canadian Immigration Integration Program (www.newcomersuccess.ca/index.php/about-ciip?lang=en-GB) is a federal government initiative to help newly landed workers find jobs that recognize their experience and education.

• Municipally based programs, such as those on offer from the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council (www.triec.ca), offer workshops on such esoterica as how to behave in a business meeting, and operate mentoring programs that pair skilled immigrants with established pros.

Planning to Work in Canada (www.credentials.gc.ca/immigrants/workbook/index.asp) is a government-produced workbook for individuals who’ve recently arrived.

• Work in Canada (www.canadavisa.com) is an online resource managed by the Montreal-based immigration law firm, Campbell Cohen. It has a slew of resources for foreign-born workers struggling with the transition.

• The Best Employers for New Canadians competition (www.canadastop100.com) recognizes the country’s best employers for recent immigrants, as assessed by the editors of Canada’s Top 100 Employers.

• Professional Networks for Immigrants (www.settlement.org/sys/faqs_detail.asp?k=WORK_CUL&faq_id=4001352) is a list of networks run by internationally trained professionals in a range of professions, useful for anyone looking to develop relationships in their field.

• Alternative Jobs to Regulated Professions (www.settlement.org/alternativejobs/default.aspx) suggests non-regulated job alternatives for different regulated professions.

• Staffing and recruitment outsourcing firms are excellent first and final stops for new Canadians. Check out the bounty at www.keenconsulting.ca.

Hiring for Culture First

Everybody’s heard a story about an office whose breakroom is stuffed with pool tables, where the sushi lunch every Friday is company supplied, where staffers set their own hours and bring their schnauzers to work. Such is the lore of company culture, the buzziest of buzz terms scorching the current corporate landscape — and managers ignore its siren call at their considerable peril.

According to a recent study by management consultancy Deloitte, today’s employees believe that company culture — or those values and practices to which an organization commits in demonstration of its identified priorities — is almost as important to business success as strategy is.

Adopt it as a critical tenet of your organizational existence and enjoy the fruits in hiring, retention, motivation, loyalty, productivity, creativity and, yes, profitability.

But how, we ask (above the cries to “Hire for cultural fit! Forget professional competencies! Skills can be learned!”) to measure for such a thing in a potential employee? Read more

A Club With You as a Member

So you’ve got yourself some membership on LinkedIn. Good for you. With more than 150 million worldwide users, LinkedIn is a virtual trout pond for folks fishing for career enhancement, whether it’s to drive more traffic to their business or score another rung on the promotional ladder.

But your efforts on this front need to be undertaken actively. Membership in the LinkedIn community is not a passive enterprise and you underuse the resource to your own considerable detriment.

Herewith then, for individuals keen to change that scene, nine tips for dropping the tastiest bait in the LinkedIn pool. Read more