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Posts from the ‘Keen Technology’ Category

National Hiring Portal for Homeless Youth Turns Problem into Possibility

There’s nothing like a bout of homelessness to dash a person’s expectations of, and chances for, viable employment. A new web-based social enterprise is seeking to address that black mark, though, with a Canada-wide program aimed at linking employers and willing would-be employees.

homeless

How it works

HireUp is a youth-hiring initiative that will operate like Workopolis does, with companies uploading in-house opportunities and youth-serving social agencies responding to them with candidates’ resumes. While most of the individuals are homeless and have yet to amass any formal work experience, they make up for this deficiency with enthusiasm for meaningful employment.

Currently, the site features some 180 full-time, and a slew of part-time, positions, on offer with companies such as Home Depot Canada, NEI Investments and Nordstrom.

The nominal fee employers pony up for their participation is reinvested in programs dedicated to improving conditions for homeless youth by way of the 18 social agencies involved in the project.

The scene by the numbers

Canada’s national youth unemployment rate was at 13.5% in October, almost double that of the general population (7.1%). Anywhere from 35,000 to 65,000 youth experience homelessness in Canada each year.

The first program of its kind in this country, HireUp is organized by corporate social responsibility consultancy Impakt. This Toronto-based organization launched the website with the collaboration of Workopolis and the Home Depot Canada Foundation.

HireUp is unique for the way it facilitates a corporation’s involvement in alleviating youth homelessness while simultaneously addressing its own personnel gaps.

Win and win.

Executive Women Can Advance on Traditional Turf

The talking heads dominating the political scene south of the border may have given a passing nod to the role the fairer sex has to play in a thriving economy during the second presidential debate, but in this country, the binders full of employable executive-level women suffer no such slight. In Canada, women are an undismissively integral part of the economic engine and, further, stand poised to capitalize on even more opportunities in days to come.

 

 

 

 

 

A new study by Ipsos Reid polled Canadian female executives and concluded that the best bets for their swelling ranks appear to be in the “traditional” fields.

Specifically, says the research, the healthcare and education sectors offer the most potential for advancement for this country’s executive-level women. Some 58% of the 500 female managers and executives polled say they feel that healthcare provides the best chances for growth in the next three to five years — more than anywhere else. A little more than half of respondents (52%), meanwhile, point to education as the most promising territory for feminine success.

Other professional fields that ranked high on the list were the not-for-profit sector (35%), financial services (32%), hospitality (29%), professional services (23%) and the public sector (22%).

Information technology (11%), engineering and construction (6%), oil and gas (3%), and transportation and logistics (2%) rounded out the list. The industry cited as the least promising for women on the climb (surprise, surprise)? Manufacturing, at just 1%.

Hiring for Culture First

Everybody’s heard a story about an office whose breakroom is stuffed with pool tables, where the sushi lunch every Friday is company supplied, where staffers set their own hours and bring their schnauzers to work. Such is the lore of company culture, the buzziest of buzz terms scorching the current corporate landscape — and managers ignore its siren call at their considerable peril.

According to a recent study by management consultancy Deloitte, today’s employees believe that company culture — or those values and practices to which an organization commits in demonstration of its identified priorities — is almost as important to business success as strategy is.

Adopt it as a critical tenet of your organizational existence and enjoy the fruits in hiring, retention, motivation, loyalty, productivity, creativity and, yes, profitability.

But how, we ask (above the cries to “Hire for cultural fit! Forget professional competencies! Skills can be learned!”) to measure for such a thing in a potential employee? Read more