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The Future’s So Bright

And so it is that another year dawns across our humble spinning marble, with the usual whipping winds and frigid temps in attendance. But at least the promise of a more temperate employment scene delivers relief. A whack of end-of-year projections portends an uptick in the job market for the coming stretch.

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The Manpower Employment Outlook Survey for Q1 of 2015, for one, uncovered considerable reason for optimism in its poll of 1,900 Canadian employers with interests that cut across a swath of sectors. It predicts a robust hiring trend to launch 2015, with some 11 percent of Canadian employers planning to expand their rosters.

Regional hiring variations appear to have done an about-face from recent times, with the preponderance of activity expected to take place in the eastern — rather than the long-swelling western — part of the country. Fourteen percent of employers in Atlantic Canada anticipate hiring more staff.

In the West, meanwhile, eight percent of employers expect to staff up in the first part of 2015 — same as in Ontario. About six percent of Quebec employers are hiring.

According to HR consulting firm Robert Half, the hiring projections of Canadian IT employers are even more ambitious, with 84 percent expecting to expand in the coming months. Indeed, folks in this sector are so in need of skilled tech professionals that half characterized their pursuit as “somewhat” or “very” challenging, with supply consistently outstripping demand.

The top five Canadian cities anticipating the most hiring in the first quarter of 2015 are:

  • Halifax, NS
  • Kitchener/Cambridge, Ont.
  • Thunder Bay, Ont.
  • Hamilton, Ont.
  • Fredericton, NB

The top five sectors anticipating the most hiring in the first quarter of 2015 are:

  • Finance, insurance and real estate
  • Manufacturing — durables
  • Public administration
  • Construction
  • Transportation and public utilities

Having achieved a national unemployment rate of 6.5 percent in October — the lowest in six years — Canada is on the decided ascent up the lush green side of the hill (the prevailing real-life backdrop of snow squalls notwithstanding).

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